Annandale

Expansive parklands, quiet streets, family and dog friendly cafes –it’s hard to beat this part of Sydney.

From a land grant given to first fleeter Colonel Johnston, and the earliest subdivisions commencing in 1876, Annandale's beginnings can still be seen in fine examples of the early 19th-century architecture. They include the Abbey at the northern end of Johnston Street and the remaining Gothic-Romanesque "witches hats" built by John Young between 1886 and 1889 for his daughters, using the earliest forms of reinforced concrete. 

Many streets have well preserved single and double storey row houses using local quarried stone and bricks. Because Annandale's topography is flatter than other inner western suburbs, its founders were able to plan wider streets, setting its private and public buildings off to greater advantage.

However, with the arrival of manufacturing and industry by the end of the 19th century, it had become very much a working man's suburb. Many of the grand homes became boarding houses or fell into disrepair. 

It wasn't until light industry relocated in the 1980's coinciding with a Sydney property boom, that Annandale once again became a highly sought after address, amalgamating with Balmain and Leichhardt Councils in 1947.

A border with the Bicentennial foreshore parkland provides access to Sydney Harbour and many streets have lovely views of the city skyline. There are a number of smaller parks, churches which date back 200 years, a Buddist Temple, primary schools, a neighbourhood centre, post office, hotels and boarding house accommodation. There's a small and extremely popular shopping centre in Johnston Street, and the neighbourhood is scattered with corner shops and cafes. 

Transport is provided by RTA bus services.